Across Disciplines. Across the World.

The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis aspires to discover the unknown, educate students and serve society. Our strategy focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, and security. Through innovative partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — we will contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world.
Freshmen engineering students learn their way around the engineering complex at Enquest, a scavenger hunt organized by EnCouncil. View more photos on Facebook.

10 Things I wish I knew as a freshman Engineering student

By Sumeet Shah
1. Never go to Subway unprepared – Trust me on this one.  The Subway at Wash U runs like a high-performance sports car – smooth, fast and efficient. Make sure you have your order ready, or else you might grind the gears.
2. You can never have too many friends – Coming into college you meet a lot of people in a very short period of time, and it can be overwhelming at first. But who knows who might make a good study buddy in that really hard class you’re taking?
3. Engineering students might be classified as nerds, but it is a well-known fact that we are among the best of the best at Wash U. Don’t worry, everyone knows it, but that doesn’t mean they like to hear it.  So the next time one of your friends starts rambling on about how great they are because they study this or that, just smile and nod.
4. St. Louis is a really fun city – St. Louis is a city full of things to do!  Be on the lookout for anything from concerts to sports games to food festivals.  They’re happening all the time, and you don’t want to miss out!
5. There’s help available all around you – Everyone coming into Wash U is really smart.  However, even smart people need help sometimes.  Wash U is full of resources to help you ace that really tough course you’re taking.  Go visit Cornerstone!
6. Work hard, Play hard is a lot better than Play hard, Work hard – Work hard, Play hard is somewhat of an unofficial student motto at Wash U, and with good reason.  Study hard and get your work done so that you can relax and enjoy yourself later.  Don’t fall into the trap of relaxing now and telling yourself you’ll finish your work later. Besides, if you get your work out of the way, you don’t have to stress about it during your fun time.
7. Keep yourself in shape – Everyone dreads the freshman 15.  Luckily, exercising at Wash U is easy.  The Athletic Complex has an amazing set of athletic facilities, and for convenience, there’s a gym on the South 40, too.  You can also take part in sports at the varsity, club or intramural level depending on your interest.
8. Take advantage of registration – When it’s time to register for classes, have a list of everything you have to take and anything you want to take.  Go ahead and register for 21 credits.  Attend them all for the first week or so, and then drop the courses you don’t really want to take.  By being registered, you keep a spot in the class open for yourself and give yourself some flexibility in your schedule.
9.  Professors are people too – Try going to office hours with your professors.  Apart from the fact that you’ll get a lot of help with any questions you have about academic material, you’ll also get to know your professors better.  They’re nice people, and have many interesting stories to tell.  I have yet to meet a single professor at Wash U that hasn’t been absolutely fascinating to talk to.
10. Take your studying in the library to the extremes – By this I don’t just mean “study hard.”  I literally mean the extremes of the library.  The middle regions of the library will likely be populated by people, meaning extra distractions.  If you really want a quiet space to get some serious work done, head to the top or bottom floors.
— Sumeet Shah is a senior majoring in biomedical engineering. 

Freshmen engineering students learn their way around the engineering complex at Enquest, a scavenger hunt organized by EnCouncil. View more photos on Facebook.

10 Things I wish I knew as a freshman Engineering student

By Sumeet Shah

1. Never go to Subway unprepared – Trust me on this one.  The Subway at Wash U runs like a high-performance sports car – smooth, fast and efficient. Make sure you have your order ready, or else you might grind the gears.

2. You can never have too many friends – Coming into college you meet a lot of people in a very short period of time, and it can be overwhelming at first. But who knows who might make a good study buddy in that really hard class you’re taking?

3. Engineering students might be classified as nerds, but it is a well-known fact that we are among the best of the best at Wash U. Don’t worry, everyone knows it, but that doesn’t mean they like to hear it.  So the next time one of your friends starts rambling on about how great they are because they study this or that, just smile and nod.

4. St. Louis is a really fun city – St. Louis is a city full of things to do!  Be on the lookout for anything from concerts to sports games to food festivals.  They’re happening all the time, and you don’t want to miss out!

5. There’s help available all around you – Everyone coming into Wash U is really smart.  However, even smart people need help sometimes.  Wash U is full of resources to help you ace that really tough course you’re taking.  Go visit Cornerstone!

6. Work hard, Play hard is a lot better than Play hard, Work hard – Work hard, Play hard is somewhat of an unofficial student motto at Wash U, and with good reason.  Study hard and get your work done so that you can relax and enjoy yourself later.  Don’t fall into the trap of relaxing now and telling yourself you’ll finish your work later. Besides, if you get your work out of the way, you don’t have to stress about it during your fun time.

7. Keep yourself in shape – Everyone dreads the freshman 15.  Luckily, exercising at Wash U is easy.  The Athletic Complex has an amazing set of athletic facilities, and for convenience, there’s a gym on the South 40, too.  You can also take part in sports at the varsity, club or intramural level depending on your interest.

8. Take advantage of registration – When it’s time to register for classes, have a list of everything you have to take and anything you want to take.  Go ahead and register for 21 credits.  Attend them all for the first week or so, and then drop the courses you don’t really want to take.  By being registered, you keep a spot in the class open for yourself and give yourself some flexibility in your schedule.

9.  Professors are people too – Try going to office hours with your professors.  Apart from the fact that you’ll get a lot of help with any questions you have about academic material, you’ll also get to know your professors better.  They’re nice people, and have many interesting stories to tell.  I have yet to meet a single professor at Wash U that hasn’t been absolutely fascinating to talk to.

10. Take your studying in the library to the extremes – By this I don’t just mean “study hard.”  I literally mean the extremes of the library.  The middle regions of the library will likely be populated by people, meaning extra distractions.  If you really want a quiet space to get some serious work done, head to the top or bottom floors.

Sumeet Shah is a senior majoring in biomedical engineering. 

“I’m an engineer.”

What does that mean to Gallaudet University President T. Alan Hurwitz? “That’s why I’m asking you before I make a decision. I’m asking you for not your opinion, but I want to know more than that. I want to know data that supports your opinion.”

Sarah Haselkorn, a senior majoring in Systems Science & Engineering, noticed that there weren’t many healthy restaurants in the area so she decided to open her own. Sarah is the CEO of Green Bean, a fast-casual salad and wrap restaurant near Washington University in St. Louis.

Freshman Kameryn Truman is part of the Saint Louis Synergy Junior Synchronized Skating Team, which took third place at the Midwestern Sectionals Competition. The team is the first from Missouri to qualify for nationals.

Engineering e-News
The January issue of Engineering e-News is out! This month’s issue featured alumnus David Hall’s startup for drug delivery and “20 minutes with Assistant Professor Marcus Foston.”

Engineering e-News

The January issue of Engineering e-News is out! This month’s issue featured alumnus David Hall’s startup for drug delivery and “20 minutes with Assistant Professor Marcus Foston.”

Source: engineering.wustl.edu

Alumnus Jim McKelvey, the co-founder of Square, was honored at the 2012 Alumni Achievement Awards. Save the date for 2013!

Source: youtube.com
Vertigo is the annual dance party where students dance on a wireless computer-controlled modular dance floor designed and built by students. View more photos on Facebook.

Vertigo is the annual dance party where students dance on a wireless computer-controlled modular dance floor designed and built by students. View more photos on Facebook.

Preston M. Green Hall is a new gateway into the Washington University in St. Louis campus.

Preston M. Green Hall is a new gateway into the Washington University in St. Louis campus.

"The atmosphere is what sets Washington University apart. Not only in the sense of great conversation in the classroom, but also in the way that students work together to achieve far beyond their peers at other institutions.” – Associate Professor Guy Genin

"The atmosphere is what sets Washington University apart. Not only in the sense of great conversation in the classroom, but also in the way that students work together to achieve far beyond their peers at other institutions.” Associate Professor Guy Genin

Team members work on their concept for the Discovery Competition, which gives  Washington University undergraduate students the opportunity to compete for $25,000 to take their innovative ideas from concept to market.

Team members work on their concept for the Discovery Competition, which gives  Washington University undergraduate students the opportunity to compete for $25,000 to take their innovative ideas from concept to market.