Across Disciplines. Across the World.

The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis aspires to discover the unknown, educate students and serve society. Our strategy focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, and security. Through innovative partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — we will contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world.

Vertigo 2013 allowed Engineering students to use what they learn in the classroom to ensure that the highlight of the event — a wireless, computer-controlled dance floor made of 32 modules, 1 billion colors and 32,000 lumens of LED lights — was ready for the 1,600 dancers. Take a look at this year’s event.

Above, from left: a stack of Vertigo dance floor tiles ready for use; testing a Vertigo dance floor tile.

Seeing lights: Vertigo LED Dance Floor
By Jeffrey Hsu 
The LED Dance Floor really sets the stage (sorry, I had to) for the intensity of Vertigo, but also for the Engineering students.
I like to think about it this way:
Students go to class (mostly).
Students learn in class (mostly).
Students want something cool (definitely).
Students imagine the concept of an LED Dance Floor (shiny!).
Students use what they learned in class to make something awesome.
The Dance Floor features many types and levels of engineering such as:
·      Designing bright and efficient LED circuits
·      Coding how data is handled and sent between modules
·      Constructing a stable frame that can handle a dancing student horde
·      Learning how to get components from industry sources
·      And making it simple enough to build in bulk (there are over 30 modules for the Dance Floor!)
The Dance Floor is one of the many student projects that show our education coming back full circle and resulting in something awesome for everyone’s benefit.
So this Saturday on the LED Dance Floor:
get pumped by the music,
get excited by the lights,
get inspired to do awesome things,
and of course, Get Dizzy!
— Jeffrey Hsu is a junior majoring in systems science & engineering with minors in mechatronics and robotics. He is president of IEEE, the student organization that maintains the dance floor.

Above, from left: a stack of Vertigo dance floor tiles ready for use; testing a Vertigo dance floor tile.

Seeing lights: Vertigo LED Dance Floor

By Jeffrey Hsu

The LED Dance Floor really sets the stage (sorry, I had to) for the intensity of Vertigo, but also for the Engineering students.

I like to think about it this way:

Students go to class (mostly).

Students learn in class (mostly).

Students want something cool (definitely).

Students imagine the concept of an LED Dance Floor (shiny!).

Students use what they learned in class to make something awesome.

The Dance Floor features many types and levels of engineering such as:

·      Designing bright and efficient LED circuits

·      Coding how data is handled and sent between modules

·      Constructing a stable frame that can handle a dancing student horde

·      Learning how to get components from industry sources

·      And making it simple enough to build in bulk (there are over 30 modules for the Dance Floor!)

The Dance Floor is one of the many student projects that show our education coming back full circle and resulting in something awesome for everyone’s benefit.

So this Saturday on the LED Dance Floor:

get pumped by the music,

get excited by the lights,

get inspired to do awesome things,

and of course, Get Dizzy!

Jeffrey Hsu is a junior majoring in systems science & engineering with minors in mechatronics and robotics. He is president of IEEE, the student organization that maintains the dance floor.

Vertigo is the annual dance party where students dance on a wireless computer-controlled modular dance floor designed and built by students. View more photos on Facebook.

Vertigo is the annual dance party where students dance on a wireless computer-controlled modular dance floor designed and built by students. View more photos on Facebook.