Across Disciplines. Across the World.

The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis aspires to discover the unknown, educate students and serve society. Our strategy focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, and security. Through innovative partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — we will contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world.
People of Engineering & Applied Science: Imani Paul, sophomore, biomedical engineering major. Imani was a summer intern at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, extracting DNA from patient samples. 
Q. What would you say to someone who might be interested in doing an internship next year?
A. What I found really helpful was leveraging our alumni network. That’s actually how I got this internship. I emailed a few alumni from the school. You can narrow it down by field, so I narrowed it down by biology and by city. I knew I wanted to stay at home and to do something in the city. I found two or three alumni, and I emailed them, asking them if they had any positions or knew of any to please let me know. One alumnus worked in that lab at Sloan Kettering, and he forwarded my resume to them, and asked them to call me. I had a phone interview a week later, and a week or two after that, I was notified that I had the internship for the summer. Honestly, I had Googled internships, New York, lab, biology, and I never found this, but by talking to the alumni, I found a few different options, and this fit the best for me.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Imani Paul, sophomore, biomedical engineering major. Imani was a summer intern at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, extracting DNA from patient samples.

Q. What would you say to someone who might be interested in doing an internship next year?

A. What I found really helpful was leveraging our alumni network. That’s actually how I got this internship. I emailed a few alumni from the school. You can narrow it down by field, so I narrowed it down by biology and by city. I knew I wanted to stay at home and to do something in the city. I found two or three alumni, and I emailed them, asking them if they had any positions or knew of any to please let me know. One alumnus worked in that lab at Sloan Kettering, and he forwarded my resume to them, and asked them to call me. I had a phone interview a week later, and a week or two after that, I was notified that I had the internship for the summer. Honestly, I had Googled internships, New York, lab, biology, and I never found this, but by talking to the alumni, I found a few different options, and this fit the best for me.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Nick Okafor, junior, Mechanical Engineering and Sustainable Development double major, coordinator of TESLA (Teaching Engineering to St. Louis Adolescents)


Q. What are your plans for TESLA?
A. Even though we’ve been volunteering for two years now, this will be the first year we’re operating as TESLA. This is growing out from the Ervin Scholars Program, which was running after-school clubs at Brittany Woods Middle School. Our purpose isn’t to take over this presence of community service and outreach in engineering and science. We know there are other groups who do similar projects, whether they be monthly or a one-time event. We hope that with TESLA, we’ll centralize the process. If you want to do Engineering outreach, you can go through us and we’ll have the curriculum and supplies ready.

 

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Nick Okafor, junior, Mechanical Engineering and Sustainable Development double major, coordinator of TESLA (Teaching Engineering to St. Louis Adolescents)

Q. What are your plans for TESLA?

A. Even though we’ve been volunteering for two years now, this will be the first year we’re operating as TESLA. This is growing out from the Ervin Scholars Program, which was running after-school clubs at Brittany Woods Middle School. Our purpose isn’t to take over this presence of community service and outreach in engineering and science. We know there are other groups who do similar projects, whether they be monthly or a one-time event. We hope that with TESLA, we’ll centralize the process. If you want to do Engineering outreach, you can go through us and we’ll have the curriculum and supplies ready.

 

See what #wustlengineers student Carolyn Arden is doing this summer to help improve health care in Guatemala by following her blog. Arden is with fellow #wustlengineers students Ananya Benegal, Connie Gan, Kelsey Lipman and Huy Lam.  

wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis
wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis
wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis
wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis
wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis
wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis

wustlnews:

A #NationOfMakers at Washington University in St. Louis

Source: wustlnews

Kendall Gretsch, Henry Lather and Kranti Peddada, three Washington University in St. Louis seniors majoring in biomedical engineering, designed and developed a 3-D-printed prosthetic arm that costs just a fraction of the price of similar prosthetics and is noticeably lighter in weight. After months of adjustments and developing, the team met Sydney Kendall, a 13-year-old who lost part of her right hand in a boating accident, and are now finalizing the arm for Sydney to use permanently. The project was for their senior design course.

Watch this HEC video featuring Eric Leuthardt, MD, who directs the Center for Innovation in Neuroscience and Technology at Washington University in St. Louis. Leuthardt is associate professor of neurological surgery at the School of Medicine and of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering & materials science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. In this video, he talks about the collaboration among physicians, engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians to find new approaches to big problems. 

Watch this HEC video featuring Eric Leuthardt, MD, who directs the Center for Innovation in Neuroscience and Technology at Washington University in St. Louis. Leuthardt is associate professor of neurological surgery at the School of Medicine and of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering & materials science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. In this video, he talks about the collaboration among physicians, engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians to find new approaches to big problems. 

Interested in consulting? Try out Engineering Test Kitchen
by Alani Douglas
Engineering Test Kitchen is a non-profit consulting firm founded and led by Washington University undergraduate engineering students. We present an outlet for a problem many students face: the dichotomy of needing an internship to gain experience and needing experience to be selected for an internship. We connect teams of high caliber engineering undergraduates to meaningful projects provided by local companies. Through ETK, students are able to develop relationships with potential future employers and gain personal mentoring from WUSTL engineering professors. 
We are wrapping up the first iteration of projects, partnering with Prozess Technologie as well as the WUSTL Catholic Student Center. Both of the projects were focused in mechanical engineering principles, however, due to confidentiality agreements, we cannot disclose specifics of the projects.
Recently, we began talking with interested companies for the next round of projects. Students on our teams have significant input into which projects are chosen, as our aim is to provide them with skills and experience relevant to their projected careers of interest. While the projects in the first round were solely based in mechanical engineering, our vision is for Engineering Test Kitchen to span many engineering and technical disciplines.
If you are interested in joining one of our teams, please join our mailing list through the “Join Us” tab on our website, engineeringtestkitchen.org, and we will contact you when we have an availability.
— Alani Douglas is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in drama.

Interested in consulting? Try out Engineering Test Kitchen

by Alani Douglas

Engineering Test Kitchen is a non-profit consulting firm founded and led by Washington University undergraduate engineering students. We present an outlet for a problem many students face: the dichotomy of needing an internship to gain experience and needing experience to be selected for an internship. We connect teams of high caliber engineering undergraduates to meaningful projects provided by local companies. Through ETK, students are able to develop relationships with potential future employers and gain personal mentoring from WUSTL engineering professors.

We are wrapping up the first iteration of projects, partnering with Prozess Technologie as well as the WUSTL Catholic Student Center. Both of the projects were focused in mechanical engineering principles, however, due to confidentiality agreements, we cannot disclose specifics of the projects.

Recently, we began talking with interested companies for the next round of projects. Students on our teams have significant input into which projects are chosen, as our aim is to provide them with skills and experience relevant to their projected careers of interest. While the projects in the first round were solely based in mechanical engineering, our vision is for Engineering Test Kitchen to span many engineering and technical disciplines.

If you are interested in joining one of our teams, please join our mailing list through the “Join Us” tab on our website, engineeringtestkitchen.org, and we will contact you when we have an availability.

— Alani Douglas is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in drama.

Meet Engineering freshman Michael Lagieski. He’s a mechanical engineering student-athlete who set a meet and school record on his way to winning the national championship in the men’s 100 breaststroke at the 2014 NCAA Division III Swimming & Diving Championships late last month. Michael talks about balancing varsity athletics with academics.

(WashUAthletics video)

SID HASTINGS/WUSTL PHOTOS


STEMs for Youth wins $25,000


Allen Osgood (in glasses), a freshman majoring in computer science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, is congratulated by his teammates following the Youthbridge Social Enterprise and Innovation Competition awards presentation April 10. Osgood, founder of STEMs For Youth, and his team won $25,000 for their program, which encourages under-privileged middle school students to pursue science and engineering through mentoring and use of LEGO robotic applications.
To see a list of the other winners, visit http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/26790.aspx.
SID HASTINGS/WUSTL PHOTOS

STEMs for Youth wins $25,000

Allen Osgood (in glasses), a freshman majoring in computer science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, is congratulated by his teammates following the Youthbridge Social Enterprise and Innovation Competition awards presentation April 10. Osgood, founder of STEMs For Youth, and his team won $25,000 for their program, which encourages under-privileged middle school students to pursue science and engineering through mentoring and use of LEGO robotic applications.

To see a list of the other winners, visit http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/26790.aspx.