Across Disciplines. Across the World.

The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis aspires to discover the unknown, educate students and serve society. Our strategy focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, and security. Through innovative partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — we will contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world.
Interested in consulting? Try out Engineering Test Kitchen
by Alani Douglas
Engineering Test Kitchen is a non-profit consulting firm founded and led by Washington University undergraduate engineering students. We present an outlet for a problem many students face: the dichotomy of needing an internship to gain experience and needing experience to be selected for an internship. We connect teams of high caliber engineering undergraduates to meaningful projects provided by local companies. Through ETK, students are able to develop relationships with potential future employers and gain personal mentoring from WUSTL engineering professors. 
We are wrapping up the first iteration of projects, partnering with Prozess Technologie as well as the WUSTL Catholic Student Center. Both of the projects were focused in mechanical engineering principles, however, due to confidentiality agreements, we cannot disclose specifics of the projects.
Recently, we began talking with interested companies for the next round of projects. Students on our teams have significant input into which projects are chosen, as our aim is to provide them with skills and experience relevant to their projected careers of interest. While the projects in the first round were solely based in mechanical engineering, our vision is for Engineering Test Kitchen to span many engineering and technical disciplines.
If you are interested in joining one of our teams, please join our mailing list through the “Join Us” tab on our website, engineeringtestkitchen.org, and we will contact you when we have an availability.
— Alani Douglas is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in drama.

Interested in consulting? Try out Engineering Test Kitchen

by Alani Douglas

Engineering Test Kitchen is a non-profit consulting firm founded and led by Washington University undergraduate engineering students. We present an outlet for a problem many students face: the dichotomy of needing an internship to gain experience and needing experience to be selected for an internship. We connect teams of high caliber engineering undergraduates to meaningful projects provided by local companies. Through ETK, students are able to develop relationships with potential future employers and gain personal mentoring from WUSTL engineering professors.

We are wrapping up the first iteration of projects, partnering with Prozess Technologie as well as the WUSTL Catholic Student Center. Both of the projects were focused in mechanical engineering principles, however, due to confidentiality agreements, we cannot disclose specifics of the projects.

Recently, we began talking with interested companies for the next round of projects. Students on our teams have significant input into which projects are chosen, as our aim is to provide them with skills and experience relevant to their projected careers of interest. While the projects in the first round were solely based in mechanical engineering, our vision is for Engineering Test Kitchen to span many engineering and technical disciplines.

If you are interested in joining one of our teams, please join our mailing list through the “Join Us” tab on our website, engineeringtestkitchen.org, and we will contact you when we have an availability.

— Alani Douglas is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in drama.

Source: 5times5

Prof. Igor Efimov, professor of biomedical engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, talked about a custom-fitted, implantable device he helped to develop that could transform treatment and prediction of cardiac disorders with McGraw Milhaven and Kelly Jackson on “The McGraw Milhaven Show” on KTRS 550 AM.

Watch Roger Chamberlain and Igor Efimov, professors at Washington University in St. Louis School of Engineering & Applied Science, talk about the companies they started based on their engineering expertise on “The Domain Tech Report.” For the entire interview, visit http://youtu.be/VoQfG3HmTGw

Source: 5times5

"The Domain Tech Report" features IDEALabs

Joe McDonald, Avik Som and Josh Siegel of IDEALabs, a bioengineering design and entrepreneurship incubator composed of a group of Washington University Engineering and Medical students, sat down with Edward Domain on “The Domain Tech Report” to discuss how the group’s members work with physicians and researchers to solve problems seen in clinical care. IDEALabs is a joint venture of the School of Medicine, School of Engineering & Applied Science and the Division of Biology and Biomedical Sciences (DBBS).  Teams of undergraduate, medical students and graduate students work together to create solutions to real clinical problems.

To see the longer version of the interview, visit: youtube.com/watch?v=JC4qVQ9XLBM.

Happy Holidays from Dean Quatrano and Mrs. Quatrano!

Vertigo 2013 allowed Engineering students to use what they learn in the classroom to ensure that the highlight of the event — a wireless, computer-controlled dance floor made of 32 modules, 1 billion colors and 32,000 lumens of LED lights — was ready for the 1,600 dancers. Take a look at this year’s event.

Washington University in St. Louis Provost Holden Thorp, PhD, talked with Edward Domain about entrepreneurship and the startup community in St. Louis for the Domain Tech Report, an online show on Techli.com. Watch the video here: http://techli.com/the-domain-tech-report-episode-1-featuring-wash-us-holden-thorp/.
Watch for more videos on the Domain Tech Report featuring Washington University through its partnership with Techli and the School of Engineering & Applied Science and Olin Business School.

Washington University in St. Louis Provost Holden Thorp, PhD, talked with Edward Domain about entrepreneurship and the startup community in St. Louis for the Domain Tech Report, an online show on Techli.com. Watch the video here: http://techli.com/the-domain-tech-report-episode-1-featuring-wash-us-holden-thorp/.

Watch for more videos on the Domain Tech Report featuring Washington University through its partnership with Techli and the School of Engineering & Applied Science and Olin Business School.

(From left) Will Whipple and Tyler Willibrand.
Will Whipple and Tyler Willibrand have both participated in the Deloitte Mentor program. Below are their personal experiences with the program.

By Tyler Willibrand

At the start of my junior year, similar to many students, I had no idea what I wanted to do after college. Toward the beginning of the school year, I received an email for the Deloitte Mentor program, which was looking for engineering students interested in technology and business. The program seemed very interesting, and I knew any mentorship program had a lot of potential benefit for me. It is important to mention that up until this point I knew nothing about consulting or what it entailed.


Throughout my junior year I participated in the mentorship program events and met with my mentor to develop my career skills. He helped me develop my resumé and significantly improve my interview skills. We worked through mock interviews to help me understand exactly what top employers are looking for and most likely to ask. On top of this personal development, I also learned a lot about the consulting industry and the need for business technology consultants.

The Deloitte Mentor program helped me find something that I was interested in and ultimately would choose as my career choice after college. I later interviewed with Deloitte Consulting for an internship, which I loved, and am now looking forward to starting a full-time job with Deloitte Consulting after college.


The mentor program is by no means only for those students pursuing a career in consulting. I happened to love the industry and have chosen to start my career there. However, the program does a great job of developing career skills that any employer would look for in a potential candidate. Oftentimes, the most difficult part of landing a dream job is the application and interview process. I really believe that the Deloitte Mentor program helps give students the skills they need to ace the job recruiting process.


— Tyler Willibrand is a senior majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in commercial entrepreneurship.


By Will Whipple


The Deloitte mentorship program is a great opportunity to make sure you are presenting yourself in a way that will stand out to companies, to familiarize yourself with Deloitte and the work that they do, and at the very least to network with an industry professional. Most of the mentor-mentee discussion topics centered around basic advice on the interview process, such as resumé writing, interview techniques and general internship searching. These are essential components to landing any position, and I found it very helpful to go over all of them with someone who had gone through the process and is now on the other side.


Additionally, as much as an engineering education equips students with the tools to solve problems, it is often difficult to fully know what specific challenges those will be. Gaining insight about the work that Deloitte and companies like it do is essential to trying to figure out the options that college students have moving towards post-graduate life, which is another valuable aspect of this program.


Finally, what I found most valuable about this program was having the opportunity to form a relationship with an experienced industry professional. Simply having an interaction with a professional on a monthly basis will help you practice interpersonal skills that will be called upon not far down the road. More importantly, the conversations that I had with my mentor helped me figure out where I want to be in the future, and understand what it is that will help me get there. I did the program as a sophomore, and I still keep in touch with my mentor now as a junior, and recommend the program to anyone who is afforded the opportunity to do it.

— Will Whipple is a junior with a double major in systems science & engineering and finance.

For more information on the Deloitte Mentor program, contact Melanie Osborn, assistant dean in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, at osborn@wustl.edu.

(From left) Will Whipple and Tyler Willibrand.

Will Whipple and Tyler Willibrand have both participated in the Deloitte Mentor program. Below are their personal experiences with the program.

By Tyler Willibrand

At the start of my junior year, similar to many students, I had no idea what I wanted to do after college. Toward the beginning of the school year, I received an email for the Deloitte Mentor program, which was looking for engineering students interested in technology and business. The program seemed very interesting, and I knew any mentorship program had a lot of potential benefit for me. It is important to mention that up until this point I knew nothing about consulting or what it entailed.

Throughout my junior year I participated in the mentorship program events and met with my mentor to develop my career skills. He helped me develop my resumé and significantly improve my interview skills. We worked through mock interviews to help me understand exactly what top employers are looking for and most likely to ask. On top of this personal development, I also learned a lot about the consulting industry and the need for business technology consultants.

The Deloitte Mentor program helped me find something that I was interested in and ultimately would choose as my career choice after college. I later interviewed with Deloitte Consulting for an internship, which I loved, and am now looking forward to starting a full-time job with Deloitte Consulting after college.

The mentor program is by no means only for those students pursuing a career in consulting. I happened to love the industry and have chosen to start my career there. However, the program does a great job of developing career skills that any employer would look for in a potential candidate. Oftentimes, the most difficult part of landing a dream job is the application and interview process. I really believe that the Deloitte Mentor program helps give students the skills they need to ace the job recruiting process.

— Tyler Willibrand is a senior majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in commercial entrepreneurship.


By Will Whipple

The Deloitte mentorship program is a great opportunity to make sure you are presenting yourself in a way that will stand out to companies, to familiarize yourself with Deloitte and the work that they do, and at the very least to network with an industry professional. Most of the mentor-mentee discussion topics centered around basic advice on the interview process, such as resumé writing, interview techniques and general internship searching. These are essential components to landing any position, and I found it very helpful to go over all of them with someone who had gone through the process and is now on the other side.

Additionally, as much as an engineering education equips students with the tools to solve problems, it is often difficult to fully know what specific challenges those will be. Gaining insight about the work that Deloitte and companies like it do is essential to trying to figure out the options that college students have moving towards post-graduate life, which is another valuable aspect of this program.

Finally, what I found most valuable about this program was having the opportunity to form a relationship with an experienced industry professional. Simply having an interaction with a professional on a monthly basis will help you practice interpersonal skills that will be called upon not far down the road. More importantly, the conversations that I had with my mentor helped me figure out where I want to be in the future, and understand what it is that will help me get there. I did the program as a sophomore, and I still keep in touch with my mentor now as a junior, and recommend the program to anyone who is afforded the opportunity to do it.

— Will Whipple is a junior with a double major in systems science & engineering and finance.

For more information on the Deloitte Mentor program, contact Melanie Osborn, assistant dean in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, at osborn@wustl.edu.