Across Disciplines. Across the World.

The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis aspires to discover the unknown, educate students and serve society. Our strategy focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, and security. Through innovative partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — we will contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world.

Experiential learning in Engineering

By Daniel Sun

The first half of MEMS 5611 (Principles and Methods of Micro and Nanofabrication) is learning about multiple lab techniques. In the second half of the semester, lectures stop and we begin our final project. We learn like researchers. We read scientific literature, planned research with our ideas, and experimented with guidance, not instructions, from the professor. Everything we did built on each other, and the course was incredibly cohesive in content and in work.

Xiaodi “Daniel” Sun is a rising senior majoring in chemical engineering and mathematics at Washington University in St. Louis. His teammates on the project were Shane Carr, a rising senior majoring in chemical engineering and computer science with a minor in nanoscale science and engineering; and Yuyang Chris Peng, who graduated May 16 with bachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and chemical engineering.  

Faculty, staff, family and other supporters who cannot attend Washington University in St. Louis’ Commencement and Engineering Recognition Ceremonies are invited to join in the celebration by watching the ceremonies live online.
Graduates: Share these links with your family and friends!
Undergraduate Engineering Student Recognition Ceremony  Thursday, May 15, 1:30 p.m.
Graduate Engineering Student Recognition Ceremony  Friday, May 16, 1:30 p.m.
All-University Commencement  Friday, May 16, 8:30 a.m.
For more information about Commencement, visit engineering.wustl.edu/commencement.

Share Commencement photos and memories on social media: #WUSTL14

Faculty, staff, family and other supporters who cannot attend Washington University in St. Louis’ Commencement and Engineering Recognition Ceremonies are invited to join in the celebration by watching the ceremonies live online.

Graduates: Share these links with your family and friends!

Undergraduate Engineering Student Recognition Ceremony
Thursday, May 15, 1:30 p.m.

Graduate Engineering Student Recognition Ceremony
Friday, May 16, 1:30 p.m.

All-University Commencement
Friday, May 16, 8:30 a.m.

For more information about Commencement, visit engineering.wustl.edu/commencement.

Share Commencement photos and memories on social media: #WUSTL14

Kendall Gretsch, Henry Lather and Kranti Peddada, three Washington University in St. Louis seniors majoring in biomedical engineering, designed and developed a 3-D-printed prosthetic arm that costs just a fraction of the price of similar prosthetics and is noticeably lighter in weight. After months of adjustments and developing, the team met Sydney Kendall, a 13-year-old who lost part of her right hand in a boating accident, and are now finalizing the arm for Sydney to use permanently. The project was for their senior design course.

Watch this HEC video featuring Eric Leuthardt, MD, who directs the Center for Innovation in Neuroscience and Technology at Washington University in St. Louis. Leuthardt is associate professor of neurological surgery at the School of Medicine and of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering & materials science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. In this video, he talks about the collaboration among physicians, engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians to find new approaches to big problems. 

Watch this HEC video featuring Eric Leuthardt, MD, who directs the Center for Innovation in Neuroscience and Technology at Washington University in St. Louis. Leuthardt is associate professor of neurological surgery at the School of Medicine and of biomedical engineering and mechanical engineering & materials science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science. In this video, he talks about the collaboration among physicians, engineers, computer scientists and mathematicians to find new approaches to big problems. 

Interested in consulting? Try out Engineering Test Kitchen
by Alani Douglas
Engineering Test Kitchen is a non-profit consulting firm founded and led by Washington University undergraduate engineering students. We present an outlet for a problem many students face: the dichotomy of needing an internship to gain experience and needing experience to be selected for an internship. We connect teams of high caliber engineering undergraduates to meaningful projects provided by local companies. Through ETK, students are able to develop relationships with potential future employers and gain personal mentoring from WUSTL engineering professors. 
We are wrapping up the first iteration of projects, partnering with Prozess Technologie as well as the WUSTL Catholic Student Center. Both of the projects were focused in mechanical engineering principles, however, due to confidentiality agreements, we cannot disclose specifics of the projects.
Recently, we began talking with interested companies for the next round of projects. Students on our teams have significant input into which projects are chosen, as our aim is to provide them with skills and experience relevant to their projected careers of interest. While the projects in the first round were solely based in mechanical engineering, our vision is for Engineering Test Kitchen to span many engineering and technical disciplines.
If you are interested in joining one of our teams, please join our mailing list through the “Join Us” tab on our website, engineeringtestkitchen.org, and we will contact you when we have an availability.
— Alani Douglas is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in drama.

Interested in consulting? Try out Engineering Test Kitchen

by Alani Douglas

Engineering Test Kitchen is a non-profit consulting firm founded and led by Washington University undergraduate engineering students. We present an outlet for a problem many students face: the dichotomy of needing an internship to gain experience and needing experience to be selected for an internship. We connect teams of high caliber engineering undergraduates to meaningful projects provided by local companies. Through ETK, students are able to develop relationships with potential future employers and gain personal mentoring from WUSTL engineering professors.

We are wrapping up the first iteration of projects, partnering with Prozess Technologie as well as the WUSTL Catholic Student Center. Both of the projects were focused in mechanical engineering principles, however, due to confidentiality agreements, we cannot disclose specifics of the projects.

Recently, we began talking with interested companies for the next round of projects. Students on our teams have significant input into which projects are chosen, as our aim is to provide them with skills and experience relevant to their projected careers of interest. While the projects in the first round were solely based in mechanical engineering, our vision is for Engineering Test Kitchen to span many engineering and technical disciplines.

If you are interested in joining one of our teams, please join our mailing list through the “Join Us” tab on our website, engineeringtestkitchen.org, and we will contact you when we have an availability.

— Alani Douglas is a sophomore majoring in mechanical engineering with a minor in drama.

Meet Engineering freshman Michael Lagieski. He’s a mechanical engineering student-athlete who set a meet and school record on his way to winning the national championship in the men’s 100 breaststroke at the 2014 NCAA Division III Swimming & Diving Championships late last month. Michael talks about balancing varsity athletics with academics.

(WashUAthletics video)

SID HASTINGS/WUSTL PHOTOS


STEMs for Youth wins $25,000


Allen Osgood (in glasses), a freshman majoring in computer science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, is congratulated by his teammates following the Youthbridge Social Enterprise and Innovation Competition awards presentation April 10. Osgood, founder of STEMs For Youth, and his team won $25,000 for their program, which encourages under-privileged middle school students to pursue science and engineering through mentoring and use of LEGO robotic applications.
To see a list of the other winners, visit http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/26790.aspx.
SID HASTINGS/WUSTL PHOTOS

STEMs for Youth wins $25,000

Allen Osgood (in glasses), a freshman majoring in computer science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, is congratulated by his teammates following the Youthbridge Social Enterprise and Innovation Competition awards presentation April 10. Osgood, founder of STEMs For Youth, and his team won $25,000 for their program, which encourages under-privileged middle school students to pursue science and engineering through mentoring and use of LEGO robotic applications.

To see a list of the other winners, visit http://news.wustl.edu/news/Pages/26790.aspx.

Source: 5times5
Michael Lagieski winning the 100 Breaststroke National Title. Photo credit: Danny Reise, WUSTL Photos.
WUSTL’s Michael Lagieski Wins 100 Breaststroke National Title
Washington University in St. Louis Engineering freshman Michael Lagieski set a meet and school record on his way to winning the national championship in the men’s 100 breaststroke to highlight five All-America finishes March 21 on the third day of the 2014 NCAA Division III Swimming & Diving Championships at the IU Natatorium.
In fourth place after the first 50 yards, Lagieski, who is majoring in mechanical engineering, closed the final 50 yards 0.2 of a second faster than the runner-up finisher to set an NCAA Division III Championship meet record with a time of 54.10. Emory University’s Andrew Wilson, who finished second in a time of 54.26, also finished faster than the previous meet record of 54.27 set in 2009. The time was more than 0.3 of a second faster than Lagieski’s own previous school record time of 54.42. Lagieski is the fourth men’s swimmer in Washington University to win a national championship, joining Michael Slavik (2006, 50 freestyle), Eric Triebe (2006, 200 free) and Alex Beyer (2009 and 2010, 400 individual medley).
Lagieski’s individual title helped move the Washington U. men into 14th in the team standings heading into the final day of competition.
The men’s 800-free relay team of juniors Luke Dobben, majoring in mechanical engineering; Matt Nutter, majoring in mechanical engineering and minoring in aerospace engineering; and Zane Turpin, and freshman Justin Morrell posted the fifth All-America finish of the day for Washington U. The Bears placed 15th with a time of 6:49.01. Dobben also just missed qualifying for the finals in the 200 butterfly, clocking a time of 1:50.29 to finish 18th, just .13 of a second off his school record. Nutter finished 35th in the 100 backstroke with a time of 51.26.
Read more about the results of the weekend’s National Championship here. 

Michael Lagieski winning the 100 Breaststroke National Title.
Photo credit: Danny Reise, WUSTL Photos.

WUSTL’s Michael Lagieski Wins 100 Breaststroke National Title

Washington University in St. Louis Engineering freshman Michael Lagieski set a meet and school record on his way to winning the national championship in the men’s 100 breaststroke to highlight five All-America finishes March 21 on the third day of the 2014 NCAA Division III Swimming & Diving Championships at the IU Natatorium.

In fourth place after the first 50 yards, Lagieski, who is majoring in mechanical engineering, closed the final 50 yards 0.2 of a second faster than the runner-up finisher to set an NCAA Division III Championship meet record with a time of 54.10. Emory University’s Andrew Wilson, who finished second in a time of 54.26, also finished faster than the previous meet record of 54.27 set in 2009. The time was more than 0.3 of a second faster than Lagieski’s own previous school record time of 54.42. Lagieski is the fourth men’s swimmer in Washington University to win a national championship, joining Michael Slavik (2006, 50 freestyle), Eric Triebe (2006, 200 free) and Alex Beyer (2009 and 2010, 400 individual medley).

Lagieski’s individual title helped move the Washington U. men into 14th in the team standings heading into the final day of competition.

The men’s 800-free relay team of juniors Luke Dobben, majoring in mechanical engineering; Matt Nutter, majoring in mechanical engineering and minoring in aerospace engineering; and Zane Turpin, and freshman Justin Morrell posted the fifth All-America finish of the day for Washington U. The Bears placed 15th with a time of 6:49.01. Dobben also just missed qualifying for the finals in the 200 butterfly, clocking a time of 1:50.29 to finish 18th, just .13 of a second off his school record. Nutter finished 35th in the 100 backstroke with a time of 51.26.

Read more about the results of the weekend’s National Championship here

Prof. Igor Efimov, professor of biomedical engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, talked about a custom-fitted, implantable device he helped to develop that could transform treatment and prediction of cardiac disorders with McGraw Milhaven and Kelly Jackson on “The McGraw Milhaven Show” on KTRS 550 AM.