Across Disciplines. Across the World.

The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis aspires to discover the unknown, educate students and serve society. Our strategy focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, and security. Through innovative partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — we will contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.

Washington University in St. Louis is dedicated to challenging its faculty and students alike to seek new knowledge and greater understanding of an ever-changing, multicultural world.

Engineering team ZnDermal a finalist for Global Impact Award

Members of the ZnDermal team (from left): Andrew Chang, Nicole Ensz, Braden Perkins, Julie Knowles.

In 2013, Suren Dutia, a Washington University Engineering alumnus, and his wife, Jas Grewal, created the Global Impact Award for Washington University students and alumni.  Their goal is to encourage entrepreneurs and assist them through education and access to mentors and capital in a nurturing environment that would allow them to grow and scale their ventures.

All are welcome to join the Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurial Studies Monday, Oct. 6, as it celebrates the finalists in the competition and announces the inaugural winner of this honor.

The event will feature a cocktail hour from 4-5 p.m. with posters and demonstrations from the finalists and the announcement of winners at 5 p.m. 

The finalists include:

·         Janji, with designs inspired by a country and proceeds helping that country with clean water or nutrition, Janji is the first running brand built around giving back;

·         Nanopore Diagnostics LLC, developing a rapid and portable bacterial diagnostic test to take the guess work out of prescribing antibiotics;

·         UStrive Inc., an innovative college admissions technology that serves as both a matching tool and social network for students and mentors throughout the entire admissions process;

·         ViFlex, developing a pair of low-cost, adjustable eyeglasses as part of a sustainable and scalable solution to reduce the burden of poor vision for the 700 million in the developing world who have untreated refractive error;

·         Visiolog has developed an efficient screening tool for underdiagnosed early-childhood vision disorders;

·         ZnDermal, a transdermal zinc delivery system, has the potential to revolutionize the treatment of diarrhea diseases in developing countries, saving and improving the quality of millions of lives. The team is made of up Engineering students. 

Judges for the award include:

·         Joni Cobb, founder and president, Pipeline

·         Mary Jo Gorman, founder, Advanced ICU Care

·         Ronald Kruszewski, chairman and CEO, Stifel Nicolaus

·         Gary Rayner, founder and CEO, LifeProof

To attend, please RSVP at http://2014-gia.eventbrite.com/.  

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Imani Paul, sophomore, biomedical engineering major. Imani was a summer intern at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, extracting DNA from patient samples. 
Q. What would you say to someone who might be interested in doing an internship next year?
A. What I found really helpful was leveraging our alumni network. That’s actually how I got this internship. I emailed a few alumni from the school. You can narrow it down by field, so I narrowed it down by biology and by city. I knew I wanted to stay at home and to do something in the city. I found two or three alumni, and I emailed them, asking them if they had any positions or knew of any to please let me know. One alumnus worked in that lab at Sloan Kettering, and he forwarded my resume to them, and asked them to call me. I had a phone interview a week later, and a week or two after that, I was notified that I had the internship for the summer. Honestly, I had Googled internships, New York, lab, biology, and I never found this, but by talking to the alumni, I found a few different options, and this fit the best for me.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Imani Paul, sophomore, biomedical engineering major. Imani was a summer intern at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, extracting DNA from patient samples.

Q. What would you say to someone who might be interested in doing an internship next year?

A. What I found really helpful was leveraging our alumni network. That’s actually how I got this internship. I emailed a few alumni from the school. You can narrow it down by field, so I narrowed it down by biology and by city. I knew I wanted to stay at home and to do something in the city. I found two or three alumni, and I emailed them, asking them if they had any positions or knew of any to please let me know. One alumnus worked in that lab at Sloan Kettering, and he forwarded my resume to them, and asked them to call me. I had a phone interview a week later, and a week or two after that, I was notified that I had the internship for the summer. Honestly, I had Googled internships, New York, lab, biology, and I never found this, but by talking to the alumni, I found a few different options, and this fit the best for me.

SWE Evening with Industry Sept. 15

Welcome back!  We hope everyone is enjoying their first few weeks of classes! On behalf of the Washington University chapter of the Society of Women Engineers, we would like to invite you to our annual event, Evening with Industry.

This unique networking event will be held from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 15, 2014, in Holmes Lounge.  The evening begins with a networking reception, similar to a career fair, during which students can approach company representatives to network and learn general information about careers and employment.  For dinner, each company will host its own table.  Students will register for specific company tables, where table discussion will highlight company work and the careers available.  Following dinner, some of the companies have decided to do presentations about their company, showcasing current projects, research areas and job opportunities.

Looking for a summer internship or full-time job?  Connect with the people who are actually doing the hiring, and get ahead on your career search early in the school year.  Still unsure about careers out there?  Come to learn about specific opportunities in your field of engineering.  The event is open to the entire engineering school, not just members of SWE, and we hope that all students will want to take advantage of the personal interaction you can get with these big name companies.  Not only will you be able to meet and interact with company representatives, but also all companies will receive the resumes of students in attendance.

Anheuser-Busch, Accenture, Citigroup, Microsoft, Capital One, Nestle, AT&T and Deloitte will be attending this event.  We hope that you will all want to take advantage of the personal interaction you can get with these big name companies.  Please send in your RSVP as soon as possible to have the best chance of sitting with your top choice company.

The cost of registration is $15, which includes a catered dinner.  A couple of the companies offered to sponsor a certain number of students, and we will give these out on a first-come first-served basis.

The RSVP can be found at CareerLink RSVP. After you RSVP, please fill out this form to indicate your company rankings and meal preference: Preference Form. The company you are most interested in should be ranked No. 1. If you do not send us your company rankings, we will place you at a table based on seating availability. All RSVPs and company rankings are due by Thursday, Sept.11!

Space is limited, so sign up as soon as possible to reserve your seat!  In addition to filling out this online registration form, you must also return your registration fee (cash or check) to the SWE pendaflex in a sealed envelope labeled with your name.  We will give priority to those who have paid, so pay ASAP!  Also, if you would like your resume to be sent to the company representatives, please upload your resume onto CareerLink when you RSVP.  All resumes must be received by the day of the event.

For more information about SWE, go to our website.  If you have any questions about the event, you can reply to this email directly or you may contact Alani Douglas and Amy Brummer, by email.

Join WUHack Sept. 12-14 

The Upsilon Pi Epsilon (UPE) chapter at Washington University in St. Louis is holding the university’s first large-scale hackathon, called WUHack, Sept. 12-14 in the Lopata Gallery. Over the weekend, more than 100 of the brightest hackers from throughout the Midwest will travel here to spend the weekend creating beautiful projects from scratch.

Students can apply here. The event will allow up to 150 participants from any university or college.

What makes this hackathon unique is the highly entrepreneurial nature of the event, says Andrew Buckley, external relations officer for the Missouri Eta chapter of Upsilon Pi Epsilon at WU. Each sponsoring company will be given the official UPE Resume Book as well as a copy of the resumes of each of the participants at WUHack.

"We want WUHack to be more than just a run-of-the-mill hackathon, and we think this type of hackathon will really draw some excellent entrepreneurial talent from all across the Midwest to Wash U for them to showcase their talent and network with some incredible companies," Buckley says.

Sponsors including Answers.com, Google, AT&T, Microsoft, Square, Lockerdome, FindTheBest and IMC will be at the event see what these students can build and the talent coming out of Washington University and the rest of the Midwest.

For details, visit here.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Nick Okafor, junior, Mechanical Engineering and Sustainable Development double major, coordinator of TESLA (Teaching Engineering to St. Louis Adolescents)


Q. What are your plans for TESLA?
A. Even though we’ve been volunteering for two years now, this will be the first year we’re operating as TESLA. This is growing out from the Ervin Scholars Program, which was running after-school clubs at Brittany Woods Middle School. Our purpose isn’t to take over this presence of community service and outreach in engineering and science. We know there are other groups who do similar projects, whether they be monthly or a one-time event. We hope that with TESLA, we’ll centralize the process. If you want to do Engineering outreach, you can go through us and we’ll have the curriculum and supplies ready.

 

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Nick Okafor, junior, Mechanical Engineering and Sustainable Development double major, coordinator of TESLA (Teaching Engineering to St. Louis Adolescents)

Q. What are your plans for TESLA?

A. Even though we’ve been volunteering for two years now, this will be the first year we’re operating as TESLA. This is growing out from the Ervin Scholars Program, which was running after-school clubs at Brittany Woods Middle School. Our purpose isn’t to take over this presence of community service and outreach in engineering and science. We know there are other groups who do similar projects, whether they be monthly or a one-time event. We hope that with TESLA, we’ll centralize the process. If you want to do Engineering outreach, you can go through us and we’ll have the curriculum and supplies ready.

 

Congratulations to @catelynzhang and @jermattack96!

Thank you to all contest participants! View all contest entries at engineering.wustl.edu/photocontest.

Congratulations to @catelynzhang and @jermattack96!

Thank you to all contest participants! View all contest entries at engineering.wustl.edu/photocontest.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Meir Friedenberg, rising sophomore, University of Maryland



Student in the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in Computer Science & Engineering in the labs of Kunal Agrawal, PhD, and Chris Gill, PhD
Q:  What did you like most about the summer research experience?
A:  About research in general, I think I learned a lot more than I would in a classroom. Because in a class, when you’re working on a problem set, you know that you’ve learned the exact set of things needed to answer this, so you just apply them. As opposed to research, where you have no idea where the solution is supposed to be, and you don’t even know what to look up, so you’re learning loads more than you actually need. You end up with a lot more information than you would from a class.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Meir Friedenberg, rising sophomore, University of Maryland

Student in the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in Computer Science & Engineering in the labs of Kunal Agrawal, PhD, and Chris Gill, PhD

Q:  What did you like most about the summer research experience?

A:  About research in general, I think I learned a lot more than I would in a classroom. Because in a class, when you’re working on a problem set, you know that you’ve learned the exact set of things needed to answer this, so you just apply them. As opposed to research, where you have no idea where the solution is supposed to be, and you don’t even know what to look up, so you’re learning loads more than you actually need. You end up with a lot more information than you would from a class.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Alicia Sun, rising junior, Washington University in St. Louis



Participant in the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in Computer Science & Engineering in the lab of Kilian Weinberger, PhD
Q: What do you like best about working with Kilian Weinberger?
A: Kilian is really nice. I’ve never taken his class, but I feel like he might be one of my favorite professors. He’s easy to get along with. He has all of this fun stuff in the lab. We need to learn how to juggle, and I’ve learned a little bit. It’s pretty fun. Sometimes if I need to have a rest from working, I just go juggle.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Alicia Sun, rising junior, Washington University in St. Louis

Participant in the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in Computer Science & Engineering in the lab of Kilian Weinberger, PhD

Q: What do you like best about working with Kilian Weinberger?

A: Kilian is really nice. I’ve never taken his class, but I feel like he might be one of my favorite professors. He’s easy to get along with. He has all of this fun stuff in the lab. We need to learn how to juggle, and I’ve learned a little bit. It’s pretty fun. Sometimes if I need to have a rest from working, I just go juggle.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Matthew Dole, rising junior, Grinnell College



Student in the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in Computer Science & Engineering in the labs of Kunal Agrawal, PhD, and Chris Gill, PhD
Q: If there were one thing from the whole summer experience that you will take back with you to Grinnell, what would it be?
A. It’s the whole experience of living on my own in a new city in a new job knowing few people — this is something I’ve never tried before. This is my first summer living away from home. It’s been a really valuable experience for me in that it’s a taste of the future. It’s given me a chance to work in something that’s very similar to the kind of career I’ll have post graduation and the kind of living experience. I’ll probably be moving to a city I’ve never been to or lived in before, and working in a job I’ve never had before with people I’ve never met before, and being able to do this trial run will make that a lot easier.

People of Engineering & Applied Science: Matthew Dole, rising junior, Grinnell College

Student in the Research Experience for Undergraduates program in Computer Science & Engineering in the labs of Kunal Agrawal, PhD, and Chris Gill, PhD

Q: If there were one thing from the whole summer experience that you will take back with you to Grinnell, what would it be?

A. It’s the whole experience of living on my own in a new city in a new job knowing few people — this is something I’ve never tried before. This is my first summer living away from home. It’s been a really valuable experience for me in that it’s a taste of the future. It’s given me a chance to work in something that’s very similar to the kind of career I’ll have post graduation and the kind of living experience. I’ll probably be moving to a city I’ve never been to or lived in before, and working in a job I’ve never had before with people I’ve never met before, and being able to do this trial run will make that a lot easier.

See what #wustlengineers student Carolyn Arden is doing this summer to help improve health care in Guatemala by following her blog. Arden is with fellow #wustlengineers students Ananya Benegal, Connie Gan, Kelsey Lipman and Huy Lam.